Mabel Capper

Today – February 6th 2018 – is the 100th anniversary of the Representation of the People Act 1918 which enabled some women over the age of 30 to vote for the first time and paved the way for universal suffrage 10 years later.

To celebrate this we are profiling Mabel Capper, Warrington’s first female journalist who devoted much of her life to the struggle for women’s suffrage.

Manchester-born Mabel Capper came from a family of active suffrage campaigners. Her mother was a member of the Women’s Social and Political Union and her father and brother were involved in the Men’s League for Women’s Suffrage.

Mabel started her career as a journalist at the young age of 10 by editing a manuscript magazine and quickly became the first female journalist on the Warrington Examiner in 1907. Described as the “engaging lady journalist” she actively publicly corresponded with other local newspapers such as the Manchester Guardian, arguing the cause for women’s suffrage.

Between the years 1907 and 1912 Mabel dedicated much of her time to the cause, including taking part in by-elections and protest campaigns throughout the country. She also took part in more militant activities such as the disruption of political meetings and polling stations as well as window-breaking. She was even one of 4 suffragettes accused of targeting Prime Minister Asquith with a bomb in Dublin, a charge that was eventually withdrawn.

Mabel was imprisoned a total of six times and was one of the first suffragettes to be force-fed as the result of a hunger strike.

In 1912 her first play, entitled ‘The Betrothal of Number 13’ was performed at the Royal Court Theatre in London. The subject matter was the stigma imposed by imprisonment, even on the innocent.

Following the declaration of war in 1914, Mabel became a nurse with the Voluntary Aid Detachment, later becoming involved with the pacifist and socialist movements. After the war she returned to journalism and worked as a journalist on the Daily Herald.

Mabel married fellow writer Cecil Chisholm in Hampstead in 1921. Following the Second World War she moved to Hastings, where she died in 1966.

Our display ‘Nevertheless, She Persisted’ celebrating the Warrington women who fought for women’s suffrage runs until 28th April 2018.

Dr Mary Anderson Noble

As you probably know, 2018 marks 100 years since women over the age of thirty gained the right to vote. To commemorate this event the museum has put up a display showing some of the hard work and campaigning that went on in Warrington at the time.

As part of this commemoration Carol, one of our volunteers, has been researching the stories around some of the women campaigners in the town and the struggles they went through in their fight for equal rights.

In this set of blog entries Carol will share some of her findings with you.

Today’s post, the first in the series, looks at Dr Mary Anderson Noble, and from here I pass over to Carol:

 

Dr Mary Anderson Noble

 

I thought it would be interesting to see the photograph of Dr Noble as not only we can put a name to a face but we can also consider her role in Warrington during WW1.

Looking at the picture we could make a generalisation. She comes across as a well-dressed and fashionable woman of the period but we can go beyond this.  If we read the headline and the article it is clear that Dr Noble was a key figure in Warrington’s history as she was appointed “Warrington’s First Lady Doctor” at Whitecross  Military Hospital.

Today women doctors are an accepted part of the medical profession but in 1917 Dr Mary Anderson Noble Mb Chb was an exception. Even more impressive was the fact that she was appointed House Surgeon at Whitecross. In 1917 Dr Noble was leading the way as she succeeded in  a male dominated profession and was appointed to a significant position at Whitecross Military Hospital where the “Boys worshipped Dr Noble” (Warrington Examiner – Happy Whitecross 28/04/1017 p5 col 6).

There is one question that I wish I knew the answer to. When she married William C.  Mackie in 1919 did she leave the profession to take up domesticity as women were expected to or did she continue as a doctor and surgeon?

Whatever the answer it is clear that Mary Anderson Noble changed attitudes and expectations.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed the first of my posts, there are plenty more to come, Carol.

Public asked to help make Warrington Festival bigger and better

Residents are being asked to help make Warrington Festival bigger and better by answering a short questionnaire.

The first Warrington Festival took place in 2015, organised by a board of partners from major organisations in the town including LiveWire, Warrington Borough Council and Culture Warrington.

25 events attracted more than 20,000 people – Pixie Lott headlined an open air gig at Bank Park, with other attractions including the English Half Marathon, a cycle festival, a medieval market and country fair.

2017’s highlights included the RivFest outdoor music festival, Warrington MELA, Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival, youth volunteering events and a family mile.

Organisers now hope to make Warrington Festival even bigger and better by asking the public to provide feedback to help enhance the offer for 2018, ensuring it meets the needs and expectations of visitors.

To complete the short questionnaire visit http://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/WARRFEST/

The closing date for responses is Friday 8 December 2017.

Duo of emerging artists lead Warrington contemporary arts extended programme

Holly Rowan Hesson, Echo (partial view), 2017, projection (looped series of 140 stills for each of six projectors), scaffold sheet, steel structure, webbing, lighting gels, dimensions variable (image credit: Jules Lister)

Holly Rowan Hesson, Echo (partial view), 2017, projection (looped series of 140 stills for each of six projectors), scaffold sheet, steel structure, webbing, lighting gels, dimensions variable (image credit: Jules Lister)

Two emerging artists whose work is currently being displayed as part of Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival (WCAF) are leading an exciting new programme of events and exhibitions.

Ellen Sampson and Holly Rowan Hesson are heading up a new year-long programme of events and exhibitions designed to continue the promotion of contemporary arts after the festival’s Open exhibitions come to a close this weekend.

Ellen has used film, photography and installation to explore the relationships between bodily experience, memory and footwear in her exhibition, Worn: footwear, attachment and affective experience, which is on display now at Warrington Museum & Art Gallery.

Fascinated as a child by the magical shoes in fairytales, Ellen trained as a shoemaker before becoming an artist.

Ellen Sampson - Worn

Ellen Sampson, Dance, film projection: 9 minutes 30 seconds, Shoes: Leather, copper, cedar, wax, paint, cotton. Image credit: Ellen Sampson)

She said: “By focusing on the shoe as an everyday object, and on the experience of wearing, I explore how through touch and use we become entangled with the things we wear.

“I look at how, through wear, our shoes become records of our journeys and lives, and how the marks upon the shoe, as traces of these experiences, can be read.”

Holly Rowan Hesson’s Echo, a projection and sculptural installation, creates dialogues with materials, memory and the physical space at Pyramid arts centre.

Holly Rowan Hesson, Echo (partial view), 2017, projection (looped series of 140 stills for each of six projectors), scaffold sheet, steel structure, webbing, lighting gels, dimensions variable (image credit: Jules Lister)

Holly Rowan Hesson, Echo (partial view), 2017, projection (looped series of 140 stills for each of six projectors), scaffold sheet, steel structure, webbing, lighting gels, dimensions variable (image credit: Jules Lister)

She said: “Through intuitive and process-led image-making, I create dialogues with material, sites and residual memories.

“This regularly starts with interrogations in specific man-made structures, buildings and physical spaces.

“Exploring uncertainty and transience, my work is concerned with the actual fragility and transitory nature of what seems solid, weighty and permanent, both physically and also in the way things are perceived.

“Using the visual language and formal concerns of abstraction, my resulting sculptural and installation work is multi-layered, often with uncertain depth of focus.”

There will also be a free talk and tour featuring both artists on 24 January, before the exhibitions close on 27 January 2018.

Thanks to support from Arts Council England, Culture Warrington, the charity which runs WCAF, the museum, art gallery and arts centre, is now developing a year-round contemporary arts engagement and development programme, starting with Ellen and Holly’s exhibitions.

By working with partners from across the North West, the charity plans to commission local, regional and national artists to connect with Warrington’s neighbourhoods throughout the year, culminating in WCAF2018.

Maureen Banner, Culture Warrington board chair, said: “While we look forward to Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival as an annual highlight it’s exciting to consider that this year we’ll have a new ongoing programme of events to keep the momentum going.

“With help from Arts Council England we’ll be able to continue bringing contemporary art to a wider audience by creating ambitious and inclusive projects.”

 

Listings information

Exhibition title: Ellen Sampson – Worn: footwear, attachment and affective experience

Dates: Until Saturday 27 January 2018

Times: All day

Admission: Free

Location: Warrington Museum & Art Gallery, Museum Street, Warrington, WA1 1JB

www.warringtonmuseum.co.uk

 

Listings information

Exhibition title: Holly Rowan Hesson – Echo

Dates: Until Saturday 27 January 2018

Times: All day

Admission: Free

Location: Pyramid arts centre, Palmyra Square South, Warrington, WA1 1BL

http://www.pyramidparrhall.com/

Arts festival competition winners announced at packed launch

Robert Watson – Bamburgh

The winners of this year’s Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival (WCAF) Open competitions have been announced at a packed event to mark the launch.

Experienced multi-disciplinary artist Tracy Hill won the Art Open competition with commendations for two pieces of work – a charcoal on Kozo paper called Cognitive Surveillance II and Matrix of Movement II which featured hand-drawn lithographs also on Kozo paper.

Tracy, who lives in Warrington, described her pieces as considering the historical legacy of post-industrial landscapes along the River Mersey and the Hunter River in Australia.

She said: “They explore perceptions of mapping, digital navigation and how we encounter our rural spaces connected with a modern obsession for locating, ordering and fragmenting our experiences.”

Having also been the winner of the first ever WCAF Art Open competition back in 2011, Tracy added: “I have always supported the festival. Since its inception, WCAF has provided an important platform for regional artists of all disciplines and stages of their careers.

“WCAF is a unique opportunity which is key for inspiring the next generation of artists; it is the point in the year when the artistic community come together and show the diversity and strength of creativity in the region.”

Second place went to Francesca Neal, who has just completed her Masters in Fine Art at Manchester School of Art, for her oil on canvas piece entitled Perfformiad.

She said: “It’s great to know there are opportunities available to artists in Warrington and the surrounding area to engage with events like Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival, which always has an exciting programme.

“I’m thrilled to be a runner-up in this year’s Art Open.”

The judges commended the standard of entries in both competitions, choosing Robert Watson as the winner of the Photography Open for his picture entitled Bamburgh, a striking black and white image which captures mist rolling across a rocky outcrop.

“I was absolutely bowled over to win,” he said. “I’ve taken pictures all my life as my dad was a keen photographer but this is the first competition I’ve entered.

“I’m both excited and nervous at having won a solo show but I feel like I’m on the first rung of the ladder now.”

Second place went to Harry Horton from Great Sankey for his Girls on Bicycle, Vietnam.

He said he was grateful to WCAF, which is organised by arts charity Culture Warrington, for giving him the opportunity to exhibit his work.

“It was a really nice surprise to finish in second place and I’ll definitely be entering the competition again next year,” he added.

The two winners will each enjoy a solo exhibition next year and a cash prize of £250 to help facilitate their work, while the runners-up won £100.

Entries for the Art and Photography Opens are on display now at Warrington Museum & Art Gallery and The Gallery at Bank Quay House respectively, until Saturday 28 October.

Visitors to the exhibitions can help choose the winner of the Python Oakley People’s Choice prize by nominating their favourite entries; voting slips are available at both venues and the winner will be announced at the close of the exhibition.

Maureen Banner, Culture Warrington board chair, said: “The launch was a wonderful evening to celebrate Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival, one of the main highlights in the Culture Warrington calendar.

“It was brilliant to see so many people at the event keen to celebrate the wealth of talent here in the Warrington area and it was an honour to award the winners with their well-deserved prizes.

“The standard of work entered in the art and photography competitions was very impressive and it must have been a difficult job for the judges who had to choose between them, so a big thankyou to them.”

The winners were announced at a packed launch night in Warrington Museum & Art Gallery on Friday following a ‘cultural crawl’ from Bank Quay House via Pyramid Arts Centre.

Also on display as part of the festival is Echo, a new installation at Pyramid by Holly Rowan Hesson which explores uncertainty and transience, and Worn: footwear, attachment and affective experience by Ellen Sampson, an artist who explores the relationships between bodily experience, memory and artefacts, at Warrington Museum & Art Gallery.

More information on the full programme can be found at www.warringtonartsfestival.co.uk

NB Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival is part of a wider calendar of events held across Cheshire in association with Slant, the county’s cultural destination programme.

Elias Ashmole – the Warrington Freemason

Elias Ashmole is probably best-known today as the founder of the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, the oldest university museum in the world. As well as being a collector he was a politician, an astrologer, an alchemist, an officer of arms … and a Warrington freemason! In fact Elias Ashmole’s account of his initiation into freemasonry in Warrington in October 1646 is the first recorded account of an English speculative Freemason.

Elias was born in Lichfield on 23rd May 1617 into a family whose fortunes were in decline. His father Simon was an ex-soldier and saddle maker while his mother, Anne, was the daughter of a wealthy Coventry draper. They were, however, able to afford to send the young Elias to Grammar School in Lichfield.

In 1633 Elias moved to London where he qualified as a solicitor and soon established a successful legal practice. In 1638 he married Eleanor Mainwaring, a member of an aristocratic family from Cheshire, who unfortunately died in 1641.

Elias sided with the supporters of King Charles I during the English Civil War and left London for the house of his father-in-law, Peter Mainwaring of Smallwood in Cheshire. In 1644 he was appointed King’s Commissioner of Excise for Staffordshire and Lichfield and soon afterwards he was made ordnance officer for the king’s forces at Oxford.  Joining Brasenose College he studied mathematics, physics, English history, law, numismatics, chorography, alchemy, astrology, astronomy and botany. Leaving Oxford in late 1645, he accepted a position as Commissioner of Excise at Worcester and as a Captain in Lord Astley’s Regiment of Foot. The regiment was part of the Royalist Infantry but his Elias’ mathematical skills meant he was seconded to artillery positions and he never seems to have seen active service.

His diary for the 24th June 1646 reads:

“Worcester surrendedred, and thence I rode out of the town according to the Articles and went to my Father Mainwaring in Cheshire.”

It was during this stay in Cheshire that Elias became a Freemason for his diary for the 16th October 1646 reads as follows:

“1646 October 16, 4.30 PM – I was made a Freemason at Warrington in Lancashire, with Colonel Henry Mainwaring of Karincham in Cheshire. The names of those that were then of the Lodge (were) Mr Rich Penket, Warden; Mr James Collier, Mr Rich Sankey, Henry Littler, John Ellam, Rich Ellam and Hugh Brewer.”

It is thought that many of those attending the Lodge that day were relations of Ashmole and appear to have been local figures as their surnames are still found in the Warrington area.

There is also another mention of Masonic activity in his diary:

“March 10-1682 – about 5 PM I received a summons to appear at a lodge to be held the next day at Mason’s Hall London. Accordingly I went and about noon were admitted into the fellowship of the Freemasons: Sir William Wilson Knight, Captain Rich Borthwick, Mr Will Woodman, Mr William Grey, Mr Samuel Taylor and Mr William Wise. I was the senior fellow among them (it being 35 years since I was admitted). There were present beside myself the fellows after named: Mr Thomas Wise, Master of the Masons Company this year; Mr Thomas Shorthouse, Mr Thomas Shadbolt Wainsford Esquire, Mr Nicholas Young, Mr John Short Shorthouse, Mr William Hamon, Mr John Thompson and Mr William Stanton. We all dined at the Half Moon Tavern in Cheapside, at a noble dinner prepared at the charge of the new-accepted Masons”.

The almost 35 year gap between diary entries on freemasonry have led some historians to believe that he was not an active freemason but the fact that he was summoned to attend a meeting in the prestigious Mason’s Hall would suggest that he was well-regarded by his fellow masons.

Ashmole married again in 1649 but the marriage was not a happy one and his second wife Mary soon filed suit for separation and alimony. The marriage did provide Ashmole with extensive estates in Berkshire which left him wealthy enough to pursue his many interests.

Upon the restoration of Charles II in 1660, Ashmole’s loyalty to the crown was richly rewarded with political offices. He became Commissioner and then Comptroller for the Excise in London and later the Accountant-General of the Excise. This position made him responsible for a large portion of the King’s revenue, gave him a considerable income and allowed him an important power of patronage.

Throughout his life Elias was an avid collector of curiosities, many of which he acquired from the traveller, botanist and collector John Tradescant the Younger. His library reflected his intellectual outlook and his interests, particularly the antiquarian, mystical and scientific studies of the time. He was one of the founding Fellows of the Royal Society, a key institution in the development of experimental science.

Elias Ashmole  died at his house in Lambeth on 18th May 1692 aged 76 years and was buried in St Mary’s Church yard in Lambeth on 26th May. He bequeathed most of his collections to the University of Oxford to create the Ashmolean Museum while the bulk of his antiquarian library now resides in the nearby Bodleian Library.

You can learn more about Freemasonry at our Masonic Tercentenary Display at the museum until Saturday 6th January 2018. Alternatively why not visit the nearby Warrington Museum of Freemasonry – see http://museum.westlancsfreemasons.org.uk/displays/visiting/for details.

 

Special exhibition launched to celebrate art gallery’s 140th anniversary

A special exhibition to celebrate the 140th anniversary of Warrington’s art gallery has launched, bringing together some of the best items in its collection.

Warrington Art Treasures is the first in a series of displays celebrating important events in the history of Warrington Museum & Art Gallery, including the opening of the Large Art Gallery in October 1877.

When the museum – the oldest public museum in the North West – opened in Bold Street in 1857 it was also home to the Warrington School of Art; the gallery was added to showcase the work of the school’s former pupils who had gained national and even international reputations and exhibited regularly at the Royal Academy.

The exhibition, which runs until 21 April, coincides with celebrations for the Royal Academy’s 250th anniversary which takes place next year, highlighting Warrington’s link with the Academy.

Janice Hayes, heritage manager for Culture Warrington, the charity which runs Warrington Museum & Art Gallery, explained the importance of marking such an occasion.

She said: “The 4th of October is a special date in our town’s history as it marks the official opening of the Large Art Gallery which houses fine art and contemporary collections.

“The museum and art gallery are an integral part of our town’s culture and heritage, and this anniversary is a great excuse to shout about our local history and the amazing items we have in our collection.

“In the mid-nineteenth century the new borough of Warrington was emerging as a leading economic and cultural centre in the North West.

“Warrington Museum played a key role in ensuring that the town’s artists were also part of the national arts scene; these Victorian aspirations are mirrored by the ambition of contemporary Warrington to become a UK City of Culture.”

Before the opening of the art gallery, the Bold Street Grade II listed building was also home to Warrington School of Art from 1857.

The Warrington Art Treasures exhibition features work by the school’s most famous pupil, Sir Luke Fildes, who progressed from illustrating for Charles Dickens and the 19th century newspaper The Graphic, to become a leading social-realist artist, confidant of painter/illustrator John Everett Millais and painter/sculptor Lord Leighton, before becoming a society portrait painter and respected Royal Academician.

Luke Fildes’ ‘Fair, Quiet and Sweet Rest’

Venetian genre paintings by his brother-in-law Henry Woods were a regular highlight of Royal Academy exhibitions and went on to feature in many public collections, and are now included in our very own Warrington Art Treasures exhibition.

Local sculptor John Warrington Wood was a prominent member of the Roman arts scene and was honoured with a specially commissioned work, a statue of Saint Michael overcoming Satan, which took centre stage when the new art gallery opened.

Also featured in the exhibition are works by local artists Edward Frederick Brewtnall and other Royal Academy exhibitors including Walter Langley and Frank Brangwyn.

Listings information

Exhibition title: Warrington Art Treasures

Dates: Until Saturday 21 April 2018

Times: All day

Admission: Free

Location: Warrington Museum & Art Gallery, Museum Street, Warrington, WA1 1JB

www.warringtonmuseum.co.uk

Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival 2017 ready to launch

(C) Ellen Sampson

A still from Ellen Sampson’s ‘Dance’. © Ellen Sampson

This year’s Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival will launch on Friday 29 September with the announcement of the Open competition winners and a ‘cultural crawl’ tour of the venues.

This exciting event will give the public a first glimpse of entries to the Art and Photography Open competitions, which will be displayed at Warrington Museum & Art Gallery and The Gallery at Bank Quay House respectively from the launch night until the end of October.

The first place prizes are £250 and a solo exhibition in 2018 and runners-up are awarded £100.

The winners of the 2016 Open competitions are currently enjoying the solo exhibitions they won last year – a first for both of them.

Artist Bex Ilsley’s Emotional Processing is on display at Warrington Museum & Art Gallery throughout the festival until Saturday 28 October, and fine art photographer Steve Deer’s A New Perspective can be seen in The Gallery at Bank Quay House until Monday 25 September.

Also confirmed for the Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival (WCAF) programme will be a new installation called Echo by Holly Rowan Hesson, at Pyramid arts centre.

The installation explores uncertainty, transience and the gap between, and interplay within, purely sensory feeling and experience and more literal, rational thought-based experience and memory.

Holly Rowan Hesson, Assembly, 2016, projection (looped series of 147 stills for each of three projectors), chairs, dimensions variable
Photo credit: Jules Lister

Holly said: “Echo comprises projection and sculptural work to create dialogues with materials, memory and the physical space.

“My work in general is concerned with the fragility and transitory nature of what seems solid, weighty and permanent, both physically and also in the way things are perceived.”

Ellen Sampson, an artist who explores the relationships between bodily experience, memory and artefacts, will be using film, photography and installation at Warrington Museum & Art Gallery in an exhibition called Worn: footwear, attachment and affective experience.

She said: “This exhibition explores our relationship with and attachment to shoes.

“Focusing on the shoe as an everyday object, and on the embodied experience of wearing, I explore how through touch and use we become entangled with the things we wear.

“I look at how material objects can become records of lived experience and how these traces of experience can be read or understood by the viewer.”

Both of these exhibitions will be on display until January.

Maureen Banner, board chair for Culture Warrington, the charity which organises WCAF, said she was excited about the upcoming festival launch and cultural crawl.

“The festival is a major highlight in Culture Warrington’s calendar and a great way for us to come together with our creative community,” she said.

The launch night on Friday 29 September begins at 6pm in The Gallery at Bank Quay House, followed by a trail around the exhibitions and venues, before the Open competition winners are announced at 8pm in Warrington Museum & Art Gallery.

More information on the full programme can be found at www.warringtonartsfestival.co.uk

NB Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival runs alongside Warrington Festival, which celebrates the arts, food, sport and heritage in the town, and is part of a wider calendar of events held across Cheshire in association with Slant, the county’s cultural destination programme.

Heritage Open Days 2017

Here’s a list of what’s on in Warrington during this year’s Heritage Open Days Festival (7-10 September 2017)

Please note, these events are not organised by Culture Warrington or Warrington Museum & Art Gallery. Please contact the individual organisations listed below for more details, or look at the Heritage Open Days website. Information correct at the time of going to press.


Friday 8th September
• St Oswald’s Church in Winwick is open 10 am – 3 pm
• St Mary’s Church in Great Sankey is open 10 am – 4 pm
• Hatton: a century of change walking tour – please note that places are limited, you must book by emailing the organiser at chair@ddhg.org.uk. The tour meets at the car park of the Hatton Arms at 6 pm

Saturday 9th September

• Cairo Street Chapel is open 10 am – 4 pm
• Church of St John the Evangelist in Walton is open 10 am – 4 pm
• Museum of Freemasonry is open 10 am – 4 pm (with pageants at 11 am and 1 pm)
• Museum of Policing in Cheshire is open 10 am – 4 pm
• St Mary’s Church in Great Sankey is open 10 am – 4 pm
• St Oswald’s Church in Winwick is open 10 am – 3 pm

Sunday 10th September
• Cairo Street Chapel is open 12 noon – 4 pm (with lecture on prominent Unitarians at 3 pm)
• Museum of Freemasonry is open 10 am – 4 pm
• St Mary’s Church in Great Sankey is open 12 noon – 4 pm


Details of this year’s events:

Cairo Street Chapel
4 Cairo Street,
Warrington,
Cheshire WA1 1ED

The earliest dissenting chapel in Warrington part of the 1662 ejection. Monuments to pupils of Warrington Academy and prominent families of the chapel including the Gaskells, Aitkins and Monks. Displays featuring the lives of Joseph Priestley who was ordained in the chapel. Anna Letitia Barbould 18th century poet and novelist, Rev Pearsall Phillip Carpenter agitator for social reform. Lectern in memory of John Howard Prison Reformer who attended Cairo Street on his many visits to Warrington. The burial grounds contains many graves including the grave of William and Elizabeth Gaskell’s son . Visitors can sit in the garden which is a quiet oasis in the town centre. A quiz based on the chapel and burial ground will be available for children and parents to complete. Visitors can take photographs, a booklet of the history of the chapel is available for £1.

Open Saturday 9th September 10 am – 4 pm
Open Sunday 10th September 12 noon – 4 pm (with lecture on prominent Unitarians at 3 pm)


Church of St John the Evangelist, Walton
Old Chester Road,
Higher Walton,
Warrington,
Cheshire WA4 6TF

The church was consecrated in 1885, having been built by Sir Gilbert Greenall, first Baronet, as part of the Walton Estate. It was designed by Paley Austin of Lancaster in a Gothic style and constructed in Cheshire sandstone. A central feature is the ornately carved reredos in the sanctuary. The organ, a 3 manual instrument built by Hill & Sons of London, is one of the finest in the area. There are many other beautiful features to view and to admire in this lovely church. The church is very close to Walton Hall and gardens and to the Bridgewater canal, so a visit will form part of a great day out.

Open Saturday 9th September 10 am – 4 pm


Hatton: A Century of Change
Hatton Arms
Hatton Lane,
Hatton,
Warrington,
Cheshire WA4 4DB

Please note that places on this tour are limited, you must book by emailing the organiser at chair@ddhg.org.uk. The tour meets at the car park of the Hatton Arms at 6 pm

An evening stroll through Hatton to celebrate a century of change. One hundred years ago, Hatton had more than a dozen working farms and many residents worked on them and on Gilbert Greenall’s estate. Come and join us on a walk of about 1.5 hours, to find out about life in the village and how it has changed over the decades since.

Please note that places on this tour are limited, you must book by emailing the organiser at chair@ddhg.org.uk. The tour meets at the car park of the Hatton Arms at 6 pm


 

Museum of Freemasonry
15 Winmarleigh Street,
Warrington,
Cheshire WA1 1NB

Featuring the Tercentenary Textiles Exhibition of Masonic banners, regalia and embroidery exhibitions. There will be guided tours (maximum 12 people) of the masonic rooms and museum and on the Saturday there will be two costumed Masonic timeline pageants 1717 – 1813. For families there will be face painting, a teddy bear hunt and activity sheets allowing visitors to design their own apron.

Open Saturday 9th September 10 am – 4 pm (with pageant at 11 am and 1 pm)
Open Sunday 10th September 10 am – 4 pm


Museum of Policing in Cheshire
Warrington Police Station,
Arpley Street,
Warrington,
Cheshire WA1 1LQ

Housed in the Victorian cells in Warrington Police Station the Museum of Policing collects, preserves and exhibits artefacts spanning the history of policing in the county since the force was founded in 1883. Items on display include a replica TARDIS-style police box, a CID custody office, a full size working police car, a Victorian cell with prisoner and custody officer, police uniforms and hats throughout the century and around the world, photographs, hand cuffs, truncheons, saber swords, police records, medals & plaques and much, much more.
On the day visitors can view a crime/forensic scene, see inside police cars & vans, hear the police band drum section, dress up in capes and helmets for photographs, solve the mystery of the missing prisoner, search constabulary family records, view books and souvenirs on sale and lots more!

Open Saturday 9th September 10 am – 4 pm


St Mary’s Church, Great Sankey
Liverpool Road,
Great Sankey,
Warrington,
Cheshire WA5 1RE

A historic grade II listed building there has been a place of worship on the site since 1640 although the current building dates from 1729. There has been a modern re-ordering in 2008, making it a fascinating mix between the old and new.

Open Thursday 7th September 10 am – 4 pm
Open Friday 8th September 10 am – 4 pm
Open Saturday 9th September 10 am – 4 pm
Open Sunday 10th September 12 noon – 4 pm


St Oswalds Church. Winwick
Golborne Road,
Winwick,
Warrington,
Cheshire WA2 8TA

The church building has been closed for some 7 years due to death-watch beetle in the ceilings; the building has been reordered and was reopened on the 2nd July 2017. Visitors will be able to look around the church; be shown around or wander by themselves. There is information to help and refreshments are on sale. Depending upon the weather, the tower will be open to visitors on Saturday 9th September. There is a children’s treasure hunt to solve clues in the church and land outside to play and picnic on. The Pugin Chancel is beautiful to see and prayerful to spend time in. There are memorials to the Legh and Gerard family and much more.

Open Friday 8th September 10 am – 3 pm
Open Saturday 9th September 10 am – 3 pm